Barton Fink Full Movie Reviews

Full Movie Reviews

Snoogans
Snoogans
Movie God

Rating of
3/4

To Ponder the Creative Process

Snoogans - wrote on 06/16/2014

This Coens piece is easily their most unique. It's another film that focuses on a central character, examining them through whatever dilemma they have while throwing in some eccentric supporting characters for entertaining distraction. The difference with this picture is that it's all about writing pictures. I've seen a couple of films covering the same subject, but none were as unexplainable as this. The film starts off mundane and becomes increasingly less so in a gradual way. MUCH less so. This story does not follow a typical three act structure, nor does it have a definite ending. It's a strong, bold, but also cold statement that leaves you thinking. There's much to decipher in the undertone; metaphors, visual cues, odd choices of humor, and the dialogue containing double …

memento_mori
memento_mori
Producer

Rating of
4/4

An interesting story chronicling a writer's desire

memento_mori - wrote on 08/23/2013

I'm a bit of a writer myself, so I could relate to the character of Barton Fink. When he was talking passionately about 'the common man' and his dislike of the pictures, I completely understood what he meant. He wanted to portray civilization as a whole and not the Hollywood clichés. It's brilliant message.
The person who in my opinion stole the show, is John Goodman. Man, that guy can act. It was almost like he was wearing a mask of kindness as Charlie, which reminded me of Kathy Bates in Misery. Both are terrifying when they are in a good mood.
The dialogue in this film is crafty. No, that's an understatement. It's fabulous. It discusses a lot of topics altogether, but nothing in particular. Kind of like being in a dream. Some quotes I like include:
'I've always found that writing …

Daniel Corleone
Daniel Corleone
Movie God

Rating of
3.5/4

Barton Fink review

Daniel Corleone - wrote on 06/11/2012

A pictured considered being film noir, a horror film, political satire and buddy flick mixed with elements of dark comedy. Barton Fink (John Turturro) was asked by Capitol Pictures head Jack Lipnick (Michael Lerner) write for a wrestling picture. His neighbor Charlie Meadows (John Goodman) sells insurance and pops in and out of his place. Barton asks assistance from Audrey Taylor (Judy Davis), the partner of skilled writer William Preston (W.P.) "Bill" Mayhew (John Mahoney), since he has ran out of ideas and time. Direction was exception with a myriad of camera angles and movements. Setting was eerie and dialogue so innovative. Fantastic screenplay evident from various characters: “We need more heart in motion pictures.” “Life is too short.” Barton – “We’re all …

nis
nis
Movie Star

Rating of
3/4

barton fink (1991) - explanation

nis - wrote on 01/23/2012

1)barton's first sentence in the novel also existed in the bible-this shows his innocence at the time(or his arrogance that the common man is innocent).

2)the peeling wallpaper shows his own mind, decaying day after day in the hell of hollywood.

3)the mosquito always wakes him up urging him to finish the script(urges him to get used to the stressful living of hollywood).

4)chet gives him pins to pin down the wallpaper/his mind from falling appart-this shows that his mind was not in a free-thinking state anymore.

5)charlie who lives for a lifetime at the earle(hell), becomes a part of it psysically(ear infection) & mentally(psycho killer).

6)the box symbolizes the experience barton gained, or what he learned and which will carry for the rest of his life.

7)charlie/mundt …

Yojimbo
Yojimbo
Movie God

Rating of
3.5/4

"Barton Fink" by Yojimbo

Yojimbo - wrote on 01/05/2012

A Broadway playwright relocates to Hollywood and suffers writer's block while enduring the attentions of an affable but mysterious insurance salesman who lives next door. Barton Fink is an odd fish, even by the off beat standards of the Coen brothers. It's actually quite difficult to differentiate the "real" from the surreal and the seedy motel in which he finds himself creates a deeply eerie atmosphere. Loaded with symbolism, the story doesn't really have a "beginning", "middle" or "end", the Coens even mocking both the base formula of low brow culture as well as the pretentiousness and self importance of men like Fink who fancy themselves as champions of the people but are in fact egoists with little respect for the "common man" they condescendingly claim to represent. Turturro puts in …

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