Bicycle Thieves ( Ladri di biciclette ) Full Movie Reviews

Full Movie Reviews

SteelCity99
SteelCity99
Director

Rating of
4/4

Bicycle Thieves

SteelCity99 - wrote on 04/28/2018

While the worldwide general situation was in an extremely tragic state, the economy was alarmingly delicate, several millions of people had died in one of the greatest and most catastrophic wars human ever made, and major cities were in a reconstruction period, a new form of filmmaking was being born in Italy, adopting totally new perspectives. A movement called Neorealism was created, which was mainly characterized by its portrayal of common citizenship living in extreme poverty conditions surrounded by delinquency, violence and considerately high economical needs. Inexperienced actors were used for trying to depict a story in the most realistic way possible and it exposed existentialist ideas, like the fact that society led a tragically boring life everyday, causing it to resort to its …

SIngli6
SIngli6
Producer

Rating of
4/4

A Neo-Realism for the Neophytes

SIngli6 - wrote on 07/06/2015

The archetypal Italian neo-realist film, Bicycle Thieves tells a minimalist tragedy as a good man, incessantly hampered by the cruel and unreasonable demands on a working class family man of post-WWII Italy, is compelled to violate his own moral code just to survive. It's a sad, sad film, and although its final moments give you a morsel of hope for the power of human kindness, the ultimate fate of our protagonist and his family is pretty much assured to be bleak. While there is much to praise about the performances, the editing, and the cinematography, what Bicycle Thieves - and other neorealist films - really deserve a high commendation for is showing audiences the plight of the poor at a time when the middle-classes were far more indifferent to such things than they are now.

Daniel Corleone
Daniel Corleone
Movie God

Rating of
4/4

Bicycle Thieves review

Daniel Corleone - wrote on 03/15/2012

Antonio Ricci (Lamberto Maggiorani) starts work with the use of a bicycle. His son Bruno (Enzo Staiola), cleans the bicycle and rides with Antonio on the way to work. The bicycle was then stolen by a thief so he asks assistance from the authorities and his friend Baiocco. Screenplay was extraordinary with lines from Antonio – “I fell like a man in chains.” Policeman - “We all make mistakes.” One of the off putting scenes were the kid was kicked on the behind while Antonio was being briefed in his work and hitting his son. Its artists and score were endearing while the camera direction was good. The realistic incidents, simple portrayals and yet effective in terms of motion picture for its era. The heartfelt conclusion and actual attempt in bringing back the bike from …

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