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Daniel Corleone's Movie Reviews (1781)

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Unbreakable 
Unbreakable review
3.5/4 stars

A story of a frail comic book art gallery owner Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson) and invincible yet lost security guard named David Dunn (Bruce Willis). The 2 men met at Elijah’s gallery when David saw a calling card left in his car. Dunn brings his son Joseph (Spencer Treat Clark) to the gallery and is influenced by the theories of Elijah. Born with Type I osteogenesis imperfecta, a rare disease in which bones break easily, Elijah is treated by David’s wife Audrey, whose marriage is deteriorating. In certain cases, David has survived a car crash and train wreck unscathed. He tests his strength by lifting more than 300 pounds with Joseph’s assistance; he was able to detect a person carrying a gun and is able to detect evil doers by a bump or through touch. After Elijah’s suggestion of going to a crowded place, David discovers a myriad of criminals; the worst help-up a household and killed the head of the family. A newspaper wrote about the rescue with a sketch of the hero who did it. The majestic yet tragic finale will make you think. A few enjoyable lines: Elijah Price – “Real life doesn't fit into little boxes that were drawn for it.” “Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here.” “You could've done of a thousand things, but in the end, you chose to protect people.” David Dunn – “You are like me. We can both get hurt. I'm just an ordinary man.”

The cast was pretty solid, giving this realistic film yet with a touch of fantasy injected. Its screenplay was though-provoking and score perfectly suited to the mood of each scene. The script was brilliantly written and the artists created an aura of realism. Camera movements and cinematography were polished, as if you were there, part of the scenes and that make you more involved with the characters persona. The details were symbolized well, green for David, purple for Elijah, bright red/orange for the delinquents. Dunn’s poncho is even to the comic book character The Spectre. Bruce Willis provides a very effective manner in portraying the perplexed yet indomitable David Dunn. He brings in the emotions of a struggling father and a man who is disoriented of his destiny. Samuel L. Jackson delivers his lines like a true professional, his “Morpheus-like” philosophies provided Dunn a better figure, and also bring the believability of his rare illness. The symbolisms of the lead is clear as crystal, people can be hero’s in their own little way, no matter what their profession is. It can be tending to your family/marriage, protecting, curing or simply helping certain individuals who need it. Also, people who are our heroes can get hurt as well. With Elijah’s being, people can easily be broken, and that certain instances make them bad. There maybe a few blemishes such as the real backstory of Elijah, the reason he was looking for Dunn, the cameo of Shyamalan as a drug dealer and some lengthy scenes. It would have been better if the antagonist and protagonist actually battled; still the movie entertained and will leave you some thought to ponder with regards to your existence. Wished M.Night Shyamalan would delve into these type of humane films with a great story involved.


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